Fibonacci Day 2022: History, Significance and Activities

Fibonacci Day is celebrated on November 23rd, this day celebrates fibonacci numbers and honors the men behind its creation, Leonardo Fibonacci!

This day honors Fibonacci who is also known as Leonardo of Pisa and Leonardo Fibonacci, Leonardo Bonacci who invented a pattern of counting that continues to influence math and technology today. The pattern is made up of numbers that sum the previous two numbers before them — 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 — and so on. 

Fibonacci Day or National Fibonacci Day is annually celebrated on November 23rd to mark the importance of fibonacci numbers in math and it also offers a tribute to Fibonacci for creating them. 

Today, the sequence is very much used in computing, stock trading, and architecture and design. And that's why it is very important for our world and thus it deserves to be celebrated. 

Event Fibonacci Day
Date November 23, 2022
Day Wednesday
Significance The day is celebrated to mark the mark the importance of fibonacci numbers in math
Observed by United States

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Fibonacci Day History: 

This day celebrates the man who introduced Fibonacci numbers and that would be Leonardo of Pisa, known today as Fibonacci. However, he does not seem to have been the first to think of this sequence, but he was the first to bring it to the European world and bring awareness to its importance in the furthering of science. Born to an Italian merchant, the young Leonardo traveled to North Africa with his father, where he was exposed to the Hindu-Arabic numeral system. In 1202, Fibonacci published "Liber Abaci", introducing Europe to the Hindu-Arabic system and his now-famous sequence. 

In Liber acaci he advocated the use of these numerals, explained the use of zero, provided ways to convert between currencies and different measurements, and described how to calculate interest. The Fibonacci sequence, one of the biggest accomplishments of Leonardo of Pisa came from a simple puzzle about rabbit population. In his book Liber acaci, Fibonacci posed this puzzle: if there are a pair of newly born rabbit - male and female - in the field and if they are able to produce another pair of rabbits in their second month of life, how many pairs of rabbits will be there after a year?


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However, the Fibonacci sequence itself was first appeared in ancient Indian mathematics, in connection with Sanskrit prosody. In the Sanskrit poetic tradition, there was interest in enumerating all patterns of long (L) syllables of 2 units duration, juxtaposed with short (S) syllables of 1 unit duration. Counting the different patterns of successive L and S with a given total duration results in the Fibonacci numbers: the number of patterns of duration m units is Fm + 1. 

Knowledge of the Fibonacci sequence was expressed as early as Pingala (c. 450 BC–200 BC). Bharata Muni an ancient Indian scholar also expressed the knowledge of the sequence in the Natya Shastra (c. 100 BC–c. 350 AD). However, the clearest exposition of the sequence arises in the work of Virahanka (c. 700 AD), whose own work is lost, but is available in a quotation by Gopala (c. 1135). Hemachandra (c. 1150) is credited with knowledge of the sequence as well, writing that "the sum of the last and the one before the last is the number ... of the next mātrā-vṛtta."   


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Fibonacci Day Significance: 

Today, November 23rd is celebrated as Fibonacci day because when the date is written in the mm/dd format (11/23), the digits in the date form a Fibonacci sequence: 1,1,2,3. A Fibonacci sequence is a series of numbers where a number is the sum of the two numbers before it. For example: 1, 1, 2, 3...is a Fibonacci sequence. Here, 2 is the sum of the two numbers before it (1+1). Similarly, 3 is the sum of the two numbers before it (1+2). 

Fibonacci numbers are strongly related to the golden ratio: Binet's formula expresses the nth Fibonacci number in terms of n and the golden ratio, and implies that the ratio of two consecutive Fibonacci numbers tends to the golden ratio as n increases. Fibonacci numbers are also closely related to Lucas numbers, which obey the same recurrence relation and with the Fibonacci numbers form a complementary pair of Lucas sequences.

One of the beauties of the Fibonacci sequence is that the series is evident all over the natural world. Petal arrangements in flowers, the ordering of leaves in plants, the shell of the nautilus, the DNA molecule and even hurricanes show patterns that correspond to the sequence. And because of its prevalence in nature, this sequence also has a tendency to be repeated by humans so that it is found in various forms of art and architecture. It can be seen in buildings, paintings, drawings, sculptures and so much more.  

Fibonacci Day celebrates this important mathematician and gives us an opportunity to marvel at the way math pervades everything around us. The Fibonacci sequence can be used to calculate the proportions of countless things on Earth and beyond, such as animals, plants, weather patterns, and even galaxies. Hence it is very important part of not just mathematics but the functioning of our world too and that's why it is an important discovery which must be celebrated.  


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Fibonacci Day Activities: 

Celebrating Fibonacci Day is best done by studying and researching about the Fibonacci sequence. There's so much about the Fibonacci sequence that leads to fascinating discoveries and even just reading about it is pure joy! Learning how to create the Fibonacci sequence is actually very easy. Simply start with 0,1. Then each additional number is always the last two numbers of the sequence added together. Like this: 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34 and so on. 

Use this opportunity to get out in nature and finding where fibonacci sequence concept is applied, which is everywhere! You can even look in your own home and yard and find places where the Fibonacci sequence structures the world around you. Some of the prime examples of nature where you dan observe the fibonacci sequence working includes snail shells, flower petals, giant sunflowers, pineapples, etc. 

Have children in your life? Then use this occasion to introduce them to the elegance of math and the importance of learning it to use in real life. Not just children infact learning about it is very important for anyone even for those who doesn't have much interest in maths, so try to educate and aware more and more about this day and fibonacci numbers in general. 

Most Searched FAQs on Fibonacci Day: 

1. When is Fibonacci Day celebrated?

Fibonacci Day is annually celebrated on November 23rd. 

2. Why November 23 is Fibonacci Day? 

November 23 is celebrated as Fibonacci day because when the date is written in the mm/dd format (11/23), the digits in the date form a Fibonacci sequence: 1,1,2,3. The Fibonacci sequence begins like this: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144… 

3. What is so magical about Fibonacci numbers? 

Fibonacci numbers appear in so many contexts in our lives and surroundings, for example, the number of the petals in a flower, the seed heads of a flower, paintings and a lot more. In fact, the beauty of a human face is based on Golden Ratio whose nth power forms the nth Fibonacci number.

Hello I am one of editors of merazone.com, our blogs are mostly event-blogging only so keep in update with us to know about all the important events

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